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How To Keep Your Immune System Healthy

Your body (including your immune system) runs on the fuel you put into it. That’s why eating well, along with several other good-for-you behaviors, is so important.
Put simply, it’s your immune system’s job to defend your body against illness and disease. The complex system is made up of cells in your skin, blood, bone marrow, tissues, and organs that — when working the way they should — protect your body against potentially harmful pathogens (like bacteria and viruses), and limit damage from noninfectious agents (like sunburn or cancer), according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

The best way you can ensure your immune system runs in a healthy way is to practice the good behaviors. Here are the essential ones.

Eat a Healthy Diet

The nutrients you get from food — in particular, plant-based foods like fruits, vegetables, herbs, and spices — are essential to keeping your immune system functioning properly, according to Yufang Lin, MD, an integrative medicine doctor at Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. “Many plant-based foods also have antiviral and antimicrobial properties, which help us fight off infection,” Dr. Lin says.

Research suggests, for example, that vitamin C deficiency may increase the likelihood of infection, according to a review published November 2017 in Nutrients. Our bodies do not produce this essential, water-soluble vitamin on their own, so we need to get it through foods (such as citrus fruits, kiwis, and several cruciferous vegetables).

Red foods such as strawberries, cranberries, and pomegranate are very high in minerals, vitamins, and organic compounds like Vitamin C, magnesium, iron, and phosphorus. These help as antioxidants and in treatment with certain conditions such as anemia, indigestion, constipation, kidney disorders, cancer, and heart disease.

Green foods such as spinach, green peppers, and green apples are rich in iron, B Vitamins, protein, and dietary fibers. These foods can help out with digestive issues, prostate health, food absorption, and also act as an antioxidant.

Protein is also critical for immune health. The amino acids in protein help build and maintain immune cells, and skimping on this macronutrient may lower your body’s ability to fight infections. In one study published February 2013 in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, mice who ate a diet consisting of only 2 percent protein were more severely impacted by the flu than mice who ate a "normal protein" diet with 18 percent protein. But once researchers started feeding the first group a "normal protein" diet, the mice were able to get rid of the virus. Sources of protein include whey protein, plant-based protein, seafood, lean meat, and poultry.

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Keep Stress Under Control

According to a review published in the October 2015 issue of Current Opinion in Psychology, long-term stress leads to chronically elevated levels of as the steroid hormone cortisol. The body relies on hormones like cortisol during short-term bouts of stress (when your body goes into “fight-or-flight” response); cortisol has a beneficial effect of actually preventing the immune system from responding before the stressful event is over (so your body can react to the immediate stressor). But when cortisol levels are constantly high, it essentially blocks the immune system from kicking into gear and doing its job to protect the body against potential threats from germs like viruses and bacteria.

Exercise Regularly (Outdoors, When Possible)

Regular exercise lowers your risk of developing chronic diseases (like obesity, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease), as well as viral and bacterial infections, according to a review in Frontiers in Immunology in April 2018.

Exercise also increases the release of endorphins (a group of hormones that reduce pain and create feelings of pleasure) making it a great way to manage stress. “Since stress negatively impacts our immune system, this is another way exercise can improve immune response,” Lin says.

At a minimum, try to meet the physical activity guidelines outlined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Adults should be getting at least 150 minutes (two and a half hours) of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise (like walking, jogging, or cycling) or 75 minutes (one hour and 15 minutes) of high-intensity aerobic exercise (like running) every week. You should also be doing strength training at least twice a week.

For even more immune system benefits, take your exercise outside. Spending time in nature has been shown to support mood, lower blood pressure, reduce inflammation, and support immune system health, according to Lin.

Sunshine also boosts vitamin D in the body, which plays a key role in immune health, too.

Get Plenty of Good Quality Sleep

Your body heals and regenerates while you sleep, making adequate sleep critical for a healthy immune response, Lin says.

More specifically, sleep is a time when your body produces and distributes key immune cells like cytokines (a type of protein that can either fight or promote inflammation), T cells (a type of white blood cell that regulates immune response), and interleukin 12 (a pro-inflammatory cytokine), according to a review published in Pflugers Archiv European Journal of Physiology.

When you don’t get enough sleep, your immune system may not do these things as well, making it less able to defend your body against harmful invaders and making you more likely to get sick. One study published in the July–August 2017 issue of Behavioral Sleep Medicine found that compared with healthy young adults who did not have sleep problems, otherwise healthy young adults with insomnia were more susceptible to the flu even after getting vaccinated.

Sleep deprivation also elevates cortisol levels, which of course is also not good for immune function, Lin says. “Our immune system wears down as a result, and we tend to have [fewer] reserves to fight off or recover from illness.”

Get at least 7-8 hours of sleep per night to optimize health. To ensure you get quality sleep, prioritize good sleep hygiene: Turn off the electronics at least two to three hours before bed, and avoid violent or stressful books or conversations, Lin says.

Don't Drink High Amounts of Alcohol

Drinking high amounts of alcohol is associated with a range of negative health effects, including lowered immune function. When you drink high amounts of alcohol, your body is too busy trying to detoxify your system to bother with normal immune system function.

According to a review published in the journal Alcohol Research in 2015, high levels of alcohol consumption can weaken your body’s ability to fight infection and slow down your recovery time. As a result, people who drink high amounts of alcohol face a greater likelihood of pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, alcoholic liver disease, and certain cancers, according to the same review.

If you don’t already drink, don’t start. If you drink occasionally, limit your alcohol consumption to one drink (equivalent to a 120 ml glass of wine) per day if you’re a woman, and two drinks per day if you’re a man.

Don’t Smoke Cigarettes

Like alcohol, cigarette smoking can also affect immune health. Anything that’s a toxin can compromise your immune system.

In particular, the chemicals released by cigarette smoke — carbon monoxide, nicotine, nitrogen oxides, and cadmium — can interfere with growth and function of immune cells, like cytokines, T cells, and B cells, according to a November 2016 review in Oncotarget.

Smoking also worsens viral and bacterial infections (especially those of the lungs, like pneumonia, flu, and tuberculosis), post-surgical infections, and rheumatoid arthritis (an autoimmune disease in which the immune system attacks the joints), according to the CDC.

“Don’t smoke,” Lin says. And avoid secondhand smoke whenever possible.

Keep Symptoms of Chronic Conditions Under Control

Chronic conditions like asthma, heart disease, and diabetes can affect the immune system and increase risk of infections.

For example, when people with type 2 diabetes don’t manage their blood sugar properly, this can create a chronic, low-grade inflammatory response that weakens the body’s defense system, according to an October 2019 review in Current Diabetes Reviews.

Similarly, people with asthma are more susceptible to catching — and even dying from — the flu, and often experience worse flu and asthma symptoms as a result of the infection, according to a study published in the July 2017 issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Living with a chronic condition can be like trying to drive a car that has only three tires. If you get sick with a virus, it’s going to take more effort for your body to recover.

 

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Reference:
everydayhealth.com/columns/white-seeber-grogan-the-remedy-chicks/ten-simple-natural-ways-to-boost-immune-system
1upnutrition.com/blogs/fitness-blog/getting-your-greens-and-reds
 

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